Can other food reduce the impact of sugar?

Photo: Mae, Unsplash

High blood sugar harms us.

You can reduce the passage of sugars into your blood before and during the journey of sugar through your body:

Sugar intake – Sweeten less.

Gut –  Fats slow down the stomach emptying therefore slow down the passage of sugar into the intestines. So one has to eat the main course before the dessert! Fluids speed up gastric emptying, so drink moderately with a meal.

Degradation of sugar in the gut and blood absorption –  Both processes are facilitated by key proteins in the gut cell membranes. Plants, like grapefruit, black currant, cranberry, contain various substances that slow down the action of these proteins. Fruits and vegetables also contain fibre, which slows down the passage of sugar from the gut. So eat the Rainbow of Health every day. <povezava the Rainbow of Health page>

Glucose blood levels – Protein ingested with sugar further stimulates the secretion of insulin, so the cells of our body take up more sugar and the amount of sugar in the blood decreases. Some substances in plants (rosehip, lemon) have a similar effect.

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Ta projekt je prejel sredstva okvirnega programa Evropske unije za raziskave in inovacije Obzorje 2020, št. pogodb 954337 in 721236 TREATMENT.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreements No. 954337 and 721236 TREATMENT.

The content does not reflect the official opinion of the European Union.

The content of this website  is intended for informational purposes only.

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All of us like to indulge in something sweet. Try the fruit first. But if not enough, sweeten with dessert. Candies are just sugar with colour, so better leave them alone. Recommended is to eat as little sugar as possible; watch out, sugar is in almost everything you enjoy.

Table sugar is sucrose, a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose.

Sucrose begins to break down in the mouth and most of it is broken down in the small intestine by the enzyme sucrase-isomaltase brush border of the small intestine.

The released glucose and fructose then pass from the intestines to the blood and through the portal vein to the liver. Fructose is metabolized, and glucose travels further through the body.

The increased amount of glucose in the blood triggers release of insulin from the pancreas. Then, muscle cells insert a glucose transporter into the membrane to generate energy and create reserves from the transferred glucose.

Multiple constituents of fruit and vegetables contribute to health.

Consuming more than 400 grams of fruit and vegetables per day improves overall health and reduces the risk of diseases, like cardiovascular, cancer and diabetes. (World Health Organization recommendation)

A diet high in fruits and vegetables helps maintain health, slows down ageing and reduces the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes.

Vegetables and fruits contain a complex blend of different substances that include minerals, vitamins, many antioxidants, and fibre, all of which help maintain good health.

Photo: Mae, Unsplash

Some fruit and vegetable dyes have nutritional value; the body uses them as vitamins, antioxidants and flavours.

Fruit and vegetable dyes are carotenoids, anthocyanins and chlorophyll.

In humans, they are in the blood as we get them from food.

Carotenoids are fat-soluble. Some are converted to vitamin A; others are aromas of roses, tea, tomatoes, almonds and wine.

Anthocyanins are water-soluble plant dyes.

Many carotenoids and anthocyanins from fruits and vegetables have antioxidant activity in the body.

Photo: Mae, Unsplash

                  

Ta projekt je prejel sredstva okvirnega programa Evropske unije za raziskave in inovacije Obzorje 2020, št. pogodb 954337 in 721236 TREATMENT.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreements No. 954337 and 721236 TREATMENT.